Our Experienced Team Treats Variety Of Disorders

We are dedicated to helping liberate you from problems that have prevented you from living life fully. We help you to reach your goals and objectives so that you can function with greater confidence and reliance on yourself by overcoming your self-defeating habits. Our sessions empower you and give you the tools to navigate your own course so you can take control of your life in effective ways and not need to rely on professionals for an extended time. Leslie Block & Associates strives to deliver the most effective and comprehensive psychological solutions that our field has to offer.

Depression is a condition in which a person feels discouraged, sad, hopeless, unmotivated, or disinterested in life in general. When these feelings last for a short period of time, it may be a case of “the blues.” When such feelings last for more than two weeks and when the feelings interfere with daily activities such as taking care of family, spending time with friends, or going to work or school, it’s likely a major depressive episode. Depression and anxiety disorders are different, but people with depression often experience symptoms similar to those of an anxiety disorder, such as nervousness, irritability, and problems sleeping and concentrating. But each disorder has its own causes and its own emotional and behavioral symptoms.

People suffering from depression – particularly ‘non-melancholic depression’ – will often have an ongoing negative view about themselves and the world around them. This negative way of thinking is often not confined to depression, but is an ongoing part of how the person thinks about life. Many or all of their experiences are distorted through a negative filter and their thinking patterns become so entrenched that they don’t even notice the errors of judgement caused by thinking irrationally. Cognitive behavior therapy aims to show people how their thinking affects their mood and to teach them to think in a less negative way about life and themselves. It is based on the understanding that thinking negatively is a habit, and, like any other bad habit, can be broken.

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental illness. It involves exposure to trauma involving death or the threat of death, serious injury, or sexual violence. Something is traumatic when it is very frightening, overwhelming and causes a lot of distress. Trauma is often unexpected, and many people say that they felt powerless to stop or change the event. Traumatic events may include crimes, natural disasters, accidents, war or conflict, or other threats to life. It could be an event or situation that you experience yourself or something that happens to others, including loved ones. PTSD causes intrusive symptoms such as re-experiencing the traumatic event. Many people have vivid nightmares, flashbacks, or thoughts of the event that seem to come from nowhere. They often avoid things that remind them of the event—for example, someone who was hurt in a car crash might avoid driving.
Cognitive-behavioural therapy (or ‘CBT’) has been shown to be effective for PTSD. CBT teaches you how your thoughts, feelings, and behaviours work together and how to deal with problems and stress. You can also learn skills like relaxation and techniques to bring you back to the present. You can learn and practice many skills in CBT on your own. Exposure therapy, which can help you talk about your experience and reduce avoidance, may also help. It may be included in CBT or used on its own.
Addiction is a condition that results when a person ingests a substance (e.g., alcohol, cocaine, nicotine) or engages in an activity (e.g., gambling, sex, shopping) that can be pleasurable but the continued use/act of which becomes compulsive and interferes with ordinary life responsibilities, such as work, relationships, or health. Users may not be aware that their behavior is out of control and causing problems for themselves and others.When referring to any kind of addiction, it is important to recognize that its cause is not simply a search for pleasure and that addiction has nothing to do with one’s morality or strength of character. Experts debate whether addiction is a “disease” or a true mental illness, whether drug dependence and addiction mean the same thing, and many other aspects of addiction. Such debates are not likely to be resolved soon. But the lack of resolution does not preclude effective treatment.
Addiction is a treatable condition. The first phase of treatment from is withdrawal from the problem substance/activity. There are both physical and psychological effects that occur when substance-taking stops, including such physical signs as nausea and vomiting, chills and sweats, muscle cramps and aches, sleeplessness, shifts in heart rate, even fever. Emotional effects include depression, anxiety, irritability, and mood swings. Withdrawal symptoms typically last three to five days. While they are rarely life-threatening, medical supervision is usually provided in residential treatment programs, and medications may be given to ameliorate the acute discomfort of withdrawal. Behavioral therapy and counseling are important elements of treatment. Cognitive behavioral therapy is often used to help patients identify, avoid, and cope with situations in which they are most likely to abuse drugs or activities. The technique of motivational interviewing is often employed to remind people of their values, as a way of avoiding use. Family therapy may be provided to help the patient maintain a supportive environment and improve family functioning.
Separation anxiety disorder (SAD), is a psychological condition in which an individual experiences excessive anxiety regarding separation from home or from people to whom the individual has a strong emotional attachment (e.g. a parent, caregiver, significant other or siblings). It is most common in infants and small children, typically between the ages of 6–7 months to 3 years. Separation anxiety is a natural part of the developmental process. Unlike SAD (indicated by excessive anxiety), normal separation anxiety indicates healthy advancements in a child’s cognitive maturation and should not be considered a developing behavioral problem. SAD may cause significant negative effects within areas of social and emotional functioning, family life, and physical health of the disordered individual. The duration of this problem must persist for at least four weeks and must present itself before a child is 18 years of age to be diagnosed as SAD in children, but can now be diagnosed in adults with a duration typically lasting 6 months in adults as specified by the DSM-5.
Cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy is the primary type of treatment used for separation anxiety disorder. Such therapy is focused on teaching children several major skills, such as how to recognize anxious feelings regarding separation and to identify their physical reactions to anxiety. They are taught to identify their thoughts in anxiety provoking separation situations, and are taught to develop a plan to cope adaptively with the situation. Other techniques are sometimes used to treat this disorder as well. For instance, systematic desensitization gradually introduces separation, measured by time and distance. Relaxation techniques, such as deep breathing, self-soothing language, and biofeedback, can help the child learn to relax more easily.

Leslie Block & Associates

12145 Jasper Avenue NW
Edmonton, AB T5N 3X9

Business Hours

Monday – Friday 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM

Phone: 780.423.2444
Email: info@lesliepsychologists.ca

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We’re here to help. Mental health issues can be a big burden and leave you feeling lost. Sometimes, the seemingly most difficult thing to do is the easiest. The journey to improvement always begins with the first step. Get in touch and help us understand your issue.

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(780) 423 – 2444

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